RUWDUC And WVI -Nepal Share Achievements And Learning’s Of End Child Marriage Campaign

RUWDUC and WVI -Nepal Share Achievements And Learning’s Of End Child Marriage Campaign

Jan. 11, 2024, 8 p.m.

In collaboration with the Government of Nepal and various CSOs actors, World Vision International Nepal (WVI Nepal) concluded its six-year campaign, ‘It Takes Nepal to End Child Marriage’, through an event in Kathmandu today.

The event was attended by child rights experts and like-minded stakeholders and included a session on national-level policy dialogue discussing the roles and responsibilities of the government, civil society organizations, national & international NGOs alike, to eliminate child marriage from Nepal by 2030.

Hon. Dr. Arzu Rana Deuba shares her views during the event.jpg

The government of Nepal has a target to end child marriage as outlined in the National Strategy on Ending Child Marriage 2016, aligning with the Sustainable Development Goals. Over the past 6 years, the campaign has reached over 400,000 children and successfully collaborated with different levels of government in 6 provinces to formulate 44 policies related to ending child marriage, indicating positive commitment to addressing this issue is being observed.

The closing event of It Takes Nepal to End Child Marriage Campaign was chaired by Dr.Arzu Rana Deubawith participation from various ministries including the Ministry of Women, Children and Senior Citizens, along with various national and international organizations working to end child marriage in Nepal.

Findings from research conducted by World Vision were shared along with stories from children impacted by the campaign and a Policy Brief launched by Joining Forces, a network of child-focused agencies committed to ending child marriage. Speaking at the event, Minister Surendra Raj Acharya said, “Child Marriage is a criminal act and robs children of their rights. Grassroot level awareness is key to stopping child marriage in the communities, at the same time a common effort of all stakeholders is required to end child marriage from our community”.

Hon. Minister Surendra Raj Acharya hands over a token of appreciation to the campaign's strategic partners.jpg

The chair for the event and parliamentarian Dr.Arzu Rana Deuba, shared her commitment to continue to work on the issue relating to children, specifically on girls and women. She also added that social awareness is not enough to end child marriage as targeted by the government of Nepal. Implementation of policies is also key to ending child marriage. At the same time, the child representative and member of the National Child Advocate CouncilPrekshya Adhikari shared about importance of child participation across decision-making as well as the implementation of programs relating to children.

The campaign ‘It Takes Nepal to End Child Marriage’ started in Nepal in 2017 August through a formal launch by the then President Bidya Devi Bhandari to bring impact through the campaign with a specific focus on strengthening systems, changing behaviors of children, adolescents and their family and influencing effective implementation of policy.

Roslyn H. Gabriel, the National Director of WVI Nepal highlightedthe importance of efficient collaboration between government and non-government agencies to eliminate child marriage in Nepal by 2030. “The campaign brought together more than65 partners at the federal, provincial and local level to join hands in declaration of 11 Child Friendly Local Governments and has been able to directly prevent 561 Child marriages throughout WVI Nepal’s working areas.

The campaign covered 46 municipalities in six provinces of the nation where 24 rural municipalities and municipalities formed ending child early and forced marriage strategy/plan/procedures, and 10 rural municipalities and municipalities have already endorsed and implemented the strategy in their respective municipalities. However, our effort should not end here, while there has been progress made, almost 1 in 3 children still marry before the age of 18 years in Nepal and the issue requires sustained focused attention. World Vision willcontinue its commitment and urges the government as well as all stakeholders to keep the momentum alive towards the efforts of ending child marriage.”, she further adds.

Dibya, a child club member and anti-child marriage campaigner shares, “We’re working to stop child marriages in our village, and we are making parents aware of the issues caused by child marriage and the laws against it. However, many of the families that marry their daughters early in our community do so because of financial constraints – sons are sent to India to find work, and girls are married.” She is a child marriage survivor who is now actively engaged in stopping child marriage in her community with support from World Vision and its implementing organizations.

Though the campaign has come to an end, the issues surrounding child marriage and child rights will continue to be a priority of work for World Vision. World Vision will continue to improve the well-being of 0.8 million children, in particular the most vulnerable ones by 2025 through its work on education, health, nutrition and WASH, disaster risk reduction, child protection, and livelihood.

In collaboration with the Government of Nepal and various CSOs actors, World Vision International Nepal (WVI Nepal) concluded its six-year campaign, ‘It Takes Nepal to End Child Marriage’, through an event in Kathmandu today.

The event was attended by child rights experts and like-minded stakeholders, and included a session onnational-level policy dialogue discussingthe roles and responsibilities of the government, civil society organizations, national & international NGOs alike, to eliminate child marriage from Nepal by 2030.

The government of Nepal has a target to end child marriage as outlined in the National Strategy on Ending Child Marriage 2016, aligning with the Sustainable Development Goals. Over the past 6 years, the campaign has reached over 400,000 children and successfully collaborated with different levels of government in 6 provinces to formulate 44 policies related to ending child marriage, indicating positive commitment in addressing this issue is being observed.

The closing event of It Takes Nepal to End Child Marriage Campaign was chaired by Dr.Arzu Rana Deubawith participation from various ministries including the Ministry of Women, Children and Senior Citizens, along with various national and international organizations working to end child marriage in Nepal.

Findings from research conducted by World Vision were shared along with stories from children impacted by the campaign and a Policy Brief launched by Joining Forces, a network of child focused agencies committed to ending child marriage. Speaking at the event, Minister Surendra Raj Acharya said, “Child Marriage is a criminal act and robs children of their rights. Grassroots level awareness is key to stopping child marriage in the communities, at the same time a common effort of all stakeholders is required to end child marriage from our community”.

The chair for the event and parliamentarian Dr.Arzu Rana Deuba, shared her commitment to continue to work on the issue relating to children, specifically on girls and women. While she also added that social awareness is not enough to end child marriage as targeted by the government of Nepal. Implementation of policies is also key to ending child marriage.At the same time, the child representative and member of National Child Advocate CouncilPrekshya Adhikari shared about importance of child participation across decision making as well as implementation of programs relating to children.

The campaign ‘It Takes Nepal to End Child Marriage’ started in Nepal on 2017 August through a formal launch by the then President Bidya Devi Bhandari to bring impact through the campaign with a specific focus on strengthening systems, changing behaviors of children, adolescents and their family and influencing effective implementation of policy.

Roslyn H. Gabriel, the National Director of WVI Nepal highlighted the importance of efficient collaboration between government and non-government agencies to eliminate child marriage in Nepal by 2030. “The campaign brought together more than65 partners in the federal, provincial and local levels to join hands in the declaration of 11 Child Friendly Local Governments and has been able to directly prevent 561 Child marriages throughout WVI Nepal’s working areas.

Panel discussion on ending child marriage.jpg

The campaign covered 46 municipalities in six provinces of the nation where 24 rural municipalities and municipalities formed ending child early and forced marriage strategy/plan/procedures, and 10 rural municipalities and municipalities have already endorsed and implemented the strategy in their respective municipalities. However, our effort should not end here, while there has been progress made, almost 1 in 3 children still marry before the age of 18 years in Nepal and the issue requires sustained focused attention. World Vision willcontinue its commitment and urges the government as well as all stakeholders to keep the momentum alive towards the efforts of ending child marriage.”, she further adds.

Dibya, a child club member and anti-child marriage campaigner shares, “We’re working to stop child marriages in our village, and we are making parents aware of the issues caused by child marriage and the laws against it. However, many of the families that marry their daughters early in our community do so because of financial constraints – sons are sent to India to find work, and girls are married.” She is a child marriage survivor who is now actively engaged in stopping child marriage in her community with support from World Vision and its implementing organizations.

Though the campaign has come to an end, the issues surrounding child marriage and child rights will continue to be a priority of work for World Vision. World Vision will continue to improve the well-being of 0.8 million children, in particular the most vulnerable ones by 2025 through its work on education, health, nutrition and WASH, disaster risk reduction, child protection, and livelihood.

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