Atom Bomb Poster Show

<br>Nitish Dev Bhattarai

Aug. 22, 2010, 5:45 p.m. Published in Magazine Issue: Vol.:4 No.-06 August 20- September 02,2010(Bhadra-04,2067)

On August 5, 2010 the exhibition of Hirosima – Nagasaki atomic bomb photo poster was inaugurated in memory of the people who were killed by the Atomic Bomb.

 


“It has been 65 years since the bombing but the Japanese still have teary eyes whenever they remember those days,” Ambassador of Japan Tatsuo Mizuno said at the function.

 


Many of the pictures in the exhibition told a story. Among these was a story of Sadako Sasaki (Sasaki Sadako, January 7, 1943 – October 25, 1955),  a Japanese girl who was two years old when the atomic bomb was dropped on August 6, 1945, near her home by Misasa Bridge in Hiroshima, Japan.


She was diagnosed with leukemia, which her mother referred to as "an atom bomb disease."

On August 3, 1955, Sadako's best friend Chizuko Hamamoto came to the hospital to visit and cut a golden piece of paper into a square and folded it into a paper crane. At first Sadako didn't understand why Chizuko was doing this but then Chizuko retold the story about the paper cranes. Inspired by the crane, she started folding them herself, spurred on by the Japanese saying that one who folded 1,000 cranes was granted a wish.

 

 

 

 A popular version of the story is that she fell short of her goal of folding 1,000 cranes, having folded only 644 before her death, and that her friends completed the 1,000 and buried them all with her. Though she had plenty of free time during her days in the hospital to fold the cranes, she lacked paper. She would use medicine wrappings and whatever else she could scrounge up. This included going to other patients' rooms to ask to use the paper from their get-well presents. Chizuko would bring paper from school for Sadako to use.

 

 

 


During her time in the hospital her condition progressively worsened. After her family urged her to eat something, Sadako requested tea on rice and remarked "It's good."

 


Those were her last words. With her family around her, Sadako died on the morning of October 25, 1955 at the age of 12.
The programme was organised by Japanese Department of Campus of International Languages, Tribhuvan University. 

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